Concept: Cap Comforter & Pin

"Luck and a Lancaster were our daily bread in those far-off, momentous days. We loved the one and couldn't expect to live without a large slice of the other. We all carried a keepsake, a sign of our trust worn around the neck, or pocketed next to the heart. It could be the ubiquitous rabbit's foot or a rosar, letter, St Christopher, coin, photograph, playing card… Mine was probably odder than most: the wishbone of my favourite hen, Blackie, whose demise enriched the family table on Christmas Day 1942. I never left the ground without it. And there was no doubt that luck had proved a true and constant friend." - Lt. Harry Yates, DFC (Pilot officer, 30 missions over the ETO) (Luck and a Lancaster: Chance and Survival in World War II)

We do not celebrate war, we celebrate the spirit of the men that carried such heavy burdens and when the odds looked suicidal they found a way to “crack on” (as they might have said). With this goal in mind we teamed up once again with the celebrated Papa Nui! This season's version salutes those Lancaster and Wellington crews, the jocks in their Spitties and Hurricanes and the boys that kept them all operational on the airfields of England.

The cap comforter is an ingenious dual purpose piece of kit that can be worn as a cap or used as a short scarf. It is essentially a tube of wool knit into a rectangle that is sewn closed at both ends. When unfurled it is a scarf. But you can also tuck one end into itself and then fold the open end out onto itself to transform it into a double layer knit cap. (Not to worry! We will ship it configured as a cap.) Using the finest knitting facilities, our all Japan version takes pure worsted wool and dye matches the glorious RAF blue of the fabulous Few.

In tribute to Lt. Harry Yates and his compatriots Mk II went the extra step to immortalize Blackie's wishbone in metal (feathers were ruffled but no chickens were harmed in the creation of the pin). We hope it brings you  good luck or at the least will serve as a reminder that luck is often overlooked as a factor in their chaotic lives as well as ours.

As the CO would declare to his crews in conclusion to the pre-mission briefing…."See you in the smoke!"